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22 Mar
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The Fresno County Democratic Central Committee has not endorsed any candidate in this race.


MEDIA RELEASE

For Immediate Release

March 17, 2017

Contact: Dave Jacobson, (818) 943-2348
Maclen Zilber, (510) 508-9142
Jacobson & Zilber Strategies

BAUMAN RECEIVES THREE GIANT LABOR ENDORSEMENTS IN RACE FOR CDP CHAIR
SEIU Local 1000 President, California Federation of Teachers President, and AFSCME District Council 36 President All Back Bauman for California Democratic Party Chair

LOS ANGELES, CA — Illustrating his widespread support among working families and labor, today California Democratic Party Vice Chair Eric C. Bauman collected endorsements from three giants in California’s progressive labor community in his campaign for Chair of the California Democratic Party, including:

  • Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 1000 President Yvonne Walker*
  • California Federation of Teachers President Josh Pechthalt*
  • American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) District Council 36 President Alice Goff*

“Eric Bauman’s vigorous dedication to improving local neighborhood schools and protecting students and classroom teachers is unrivaled in this race. No other candidate matches his experience, skill-sets, and deep commitment to the cause of the labor movement, standing up for working families, but most importantly, ensuring that all students of all backgrounds in our state receive the best education possible. I’ve just described a few of the many reasons why I’m proud to back Eric C. Bauman for Chair of the California Democratic Party.”
— California Federation of Teachers President Josh Pechthalt*

Bauman has been endorsed by scores of progressive leaders and organizations, particularly from the labor movement, including: Former U.S. Labor Secretary and Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda L. Solis; UNITE HERE General Vice President for Immigration, Civil Rights, and Diversity Maria Elena Durazo, who also serves as Vice Chair of the Democratic National Committee; United Teachers Los Angeles President Alex Caputo-Pearl; the California Faculty Association; Southwest Regional Council of Carpenters; the National Union of Healthcare Workers; the California Professional Firefighters; AFSCME/United Nurses Associations of California; the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Locals 770 and 324; the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades; the State Building and Construction Trades Council of California, among others.

Eric C. Bauman is the Vice Chair of the California Democratic Party and Chair of the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, the largest local Democratic Party in the nation. His campaign for CDP Chair is building a wide-ranging coalition of support that represents every corner of our state and all of its great diversity.

*Titles for identification purposes only

 

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22 Mar
0

How would the President’s Budget Blueprint impact the Valley?

Dear Friend,

This week, President Trump released his Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Blueprint. It is important to note that the President’s budget is not something that gets enacted into law, but it is a “wish list” for the programs the President would like to see funded and defunded by Congress.

Federal grants, like the Community Development Block Grant and TIGER Grant, are critical funding streams for our San Joaquin Valley, and President Trump wants to completely eliminate them. Furthermore, the budget blueprint cuts the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) budget by 21 percent. The USDA oversees an array of programs, from supporting Valley farmers, investing in rural development, increasing drought resilience to managing forest cleanup and wildfire prevention.

Supporting our nation’s veterans has always been one of my number one priorities, and I am pleased that the budget blueprint includes a $4.4 billion increase in funding for veterans. The increased funding will go toward improving access to quality medical care for our nation’s veterans.

The budget blueprint adds $54 billion in military spending and cuts core programs, like those that ensure safe drinking water, provide protection from floods, fund cancer research and invest in our children’s education. This proposal would prove to have negative consequences for the majority of Americans, and in failing to address the main drivers of the federal debt, it is not a serious outline to putting our country on a path forward for fiscal sustainability.

I stand ready to work on a bipartisan basis with my colleagues in Congress and President Trump on a federal budget that will provide funding for programs that are important for all Americans, will keep our country safe, and will get our nation’s fiscal house in order.

As always, please contact my staff if my office can ever be of assistance. To stay up-to-date on the work I am doing in Congress, please sign up for my e-newsletters.

Sincerely,

Jim Costa
Member of Congress

List of programs, organized by federal agency that President Trump would like to eliminate:

Department of Agriculture

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $17.9 billion for USDA, a $4.7 billion or 21 percent decrease.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program: Provides funding for clean drinking water, sanitary sewage disposal and storm-water drainage programs in rural areas.
  • Rural Business and Cooperative Service’s discretionary programs: Provides financial assistance for economic development programs in rural communities, including renewable energy and biofuel initiatives.
  • McGovern-Dole International Food for Education Program: Supports education, child development and food security initiatives in low-income, food-deficit countries around the world.

Department of Commerce

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $7.8 billion for the Department of Commerce, a $1.5 billion or 16 percent decrease.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • Economic Development Administration: Provides grants and assistance to create new jobs, retain businesses and stimulate growth in economically distressed communities.
  • Minority Business Development Agency: Promotes the growth of minority-owned businesses through advocacy, policy, research and access to capital and contracts.
  • Manufacturing Extension Partnership: Regional centers that assist smaller, U.S. manufacturing companies with adopting new technologies.

Department of Education

The President’s 2018 Budget provides $59 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Education, a $9 billion or 13 percent reduction.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • Supporting Effective Instruction State Grants: Provides grants to non-profit organizations that recruit and provide professional enhancement for teachers and principals.
  • 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Supports community learning centers that provide before-and after-school programs for children, particularly those in high-poverty areas.
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant: Provides need-based grants of up to $4,000 to low-income undergraduates for postsecondary education.
  • Striving Readers: Helps states fund literacy programs for children, birth through grade 12, including those with disabilities and limited English.
  • Teacher Quality Partnership: Funds initiatives aimed at improving the quality of new teachers through better development and recruiting methods.
  • Impact Aid Support Payments for Federal Property: Provides funding to school districts that have a diminished tax base due to federal property ownership in the district.

Department of Energy

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $28.0 billion for DOE, a $1.7 billion or 5.6 percent decrease.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy: Provides funding and support to short-term energy research projects aimed at improving the U.S. economy, environment and national security.
  • Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program: Provides loans to support the use of new energy technology.
  • Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Program: Provides loans to automotive and component manufacturers for facilities and engineering that support advanced technology vehicles.
  • Weatherization Assistance Program: Provides grants to local governments to improve weatherization and energy efficiency of homes of low-income residents.
  • State Energy Program: Supports local State Energy Offices in advancing energy efficiency and infrastructure.

Department of Health and Human Services

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $69.0 billion for HHS, a $15.1 billion or 17.9 percent decrease.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program: Provides assistance to low income families to help pay for their home’s energy bills and some energy-related maintenance.
  • Community Services Block Grant: Funds projects aimed at reducing poverty in communities, including projects focused on education, nutrition, employment and housing.

Department of Housing and Urban Development

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $40.7 billion in gross discretionary funding for HUD, a $6.2 billion or 13.2 percent decrease.

Eliminates funding for the following programs:

  • Community Development Block Grant Program: Funds programs that assist low-income people with housing issues, including the elimination of urban blight and other community programs.
  • HOME Investment Partnerships Program: Provides block grants to state and local governments to create affordable housing solutions for low-income households.
  • Choice Neighborhoods: Funds programs to replace distressed public housing and promotes investment for neighborhood improvement.
  • Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program: Funds nonprofit organizations that build new housing for low-income families through sweat equity and volunteer labor, like Habitat for Humanity.
  • Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and Affordable Housing: Works with nonprofit groups to fund community development and affordable housing initiatives aimed at low-income families.

Department of Labor

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $9.6 billion for the Department of Labor, a $2.5 billion or 21 percent decrease.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • Senior Community Service Employment Program: A community service and work-based job training program for older Americans, including training for low-income, unemployed seniors.
  • Bureau of International Labor Affairs grant program: Provides funding for research initiatives and projects in over 94 countries to combat child labor and forced labor.
  • Occupational Safety and Health Administration training grants: Provides grants for training and education programs for employers and workers on the prevention of safety and health hazards in the workplace.

Department of Transportation

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $16.2 billion for DOT’s discretionary budget, a $2.4 billion or 13 percent decrease.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • Federal support for Amtrak’s long distance train services: Subsidizes the cost of traveling on Amtrak’s long-distance routes.
  • Essential Air Service: Subsidizes airlines for regular flights to and from small and midsize regional airports like those in the San Joaquin Valley.
  • TIGER discretionary grant program: Provides transportation infrastructure grants to state, local and tribal governments.

Environmental Protection Agency

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $5.7 billion for the Environmental Protection Agency, a savings of $2.6 billion, or 31 percent decrease.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • Clean Power Plan: Creates national standards for carbon pollution from power plants and helps states develop and deploy clean energy alternatives.
  • International climate change programs: Promotes clean and efficient energy technologies and the sharing of scientific climate research through multilateral initiatives and treaties.
  • Climate change research and partnership programs: Research and report on climate change’s impact on the U.S.
  • Energy Star: Certifies and recognizes buildings and consumer products that meet specific energy-efficiency criteria.
  • Targeted Air Shed grants: Assists local and state air pollution control agencies in developing plans and implementing projects to reduce air pollution in highly polluted areas, like the San Joaquin Valley.

Small Business Administration

The President’s 2018 Budget requests $826.5 million for SBA, a $43.2 million or 5.0 percent decrease.

Eliminates the following programs:

  • PRIME technical assistance grants: Provides training and technical assistance to organizations that help disadvantaged entrepreneurs.
  • Regional Innovation Clusters: Supports public-private partnerships concentrated in regional groups to strengthen small businesses.
  • Growth Accelerators: Funds startups that support underserved communities and areas with less access to venture capital.

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22 Mar
0

Fresno Center for Nonviolence April Calendar

Dear Friends of the Center: Here is our Center for Nonviolence April calendar. There are a lot of events happening in April!

I have added the April 10th Demonstration and Fast for Yemen as I wanted to send you the link to Kathy Kelly’s piece at Voices for Creative Nonviolence. Kathy will be our keynote speaker at our 25th Anniversary Celebration on Saturday, May 6. And, of course, hope that you will try and come to that demonstration.

Angela

Saturday, April 1 from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. come out to the Cambridge Avenue Block Sale 704 E. Cambridge. Our Center for Nonviolence has been invited by Joan Hughes to use her front yard to sell all sorts of tantalizing items during the Annual Cambridge Block Sale on Saturday, April 1st. The address is: 704 E. Cambridge. Please come and shop and help us raise money for the Center. If you have any items that we can sell, please email angela.price41@comcast.net or just bring them to the Center Mon-Fri 11 – 3. For more information call (559)237-3223.

Thursday, April 6 at 6:30 p.m.at the Fresno Center for Nonviolence, 1584 N. Van Ness Ave., Fresno, CA Fresno Center for Nonviolence monthly Board meeting. For more information call 559-237-3223. Please note temporary change of day and time this month only.

Monday, April 10, 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Demonstration and Fast for Yemen at Riverpark corner of Blackstone and Nees Avenues. Join Peace Fresno and national peace groups in calling for a humane response to the deadly tragedy facing Yemeni civilians whose country, ravaged by civil war and regularly targeted with Saudi and U.S. airstrikes, is now on the brink of famine. See “Yemenis Endure World’s Largest, Rapidly Worsening Humanitarian Crisis While Subject to a Sea Blockade and Constant Bombing” March 14, 2017 Kathy Kelly, http://vcnv.org/2017/03/14/yemenis-endure-worlds-largest-rapidly-worsening-humanitarian-crisis-while-subject-to-a-sea-blockade-and-constant-bombing/

Wednesday, April 19, 3 to 3:30 p.m.
On “Speaking Truth to Empire” on KFCF 88.1 Free Speech Radio for Central California, Dan Yaseen interviews Kathy Kelly, a peace and justice activist. She is a 3 times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee. She coordinates Voices for Creative Nonviolence (www.vcnv.org), a campaign to end U. S. military and economic warfare. Tune in to KFCF 88.1 FM or login to: http://www.kfcf.org/KFCF/?page_id=266

Wednesday, April 12th 3-3:30 p.m. on KFCF 88.1, The Fresno Center for Nonviolence monthly “Stir It Up” radio show will be hosted by Angela Price who will be discussing Fresno Earth Day with Rita Bell, one of its organizers. Call-ins are encouraged at 559-266-8888. If you are not able to listen then, we always record the show on a flash drive and create a link to the program. Call the Center at (559) 237-3223 Mon-Fri 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. for more information.

Thursday, April 13 at 7 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 2672 E. Alluvial, Fresno The Fresno Center for Nonviolence will be showing the film “30 Seconds to Midnight.” This is co-sponsored by the Social Action Committee of the Unitarian Universalist Church, Peace Fresno and WILPF. The filmmaker, Regis Tremblay, will be present to talk about the film and answer questions. Open and free to the public. Run-time is 1:34. For more information call or email Angela Price at angela.price41@comcast.net 559-304-9183.

A shocking documentary that traces the origins of U.S. genocides, military interventions and wars from the 15th century when the white, colonial explorers first came to the Americas to the very present. American Exceptionalism, Manifest Destiny, and the right to claim the earth and its resources as their own are the beliefs that are the foundation of American foreign policy in the 21st Century that has humanity on the brink of extinction. Dr. Helen Caldicot, Ray McGovern, Chris Hedges, Ann Wright, Peter Kuznick, Bill McKibben, David Vine, Bruce Gagnon, and other activists, scholars, and authors explain and clarify the crisis and threats to life on the planet.

Friday, April 14 at 2 p.m. at Fresno Center for Nonviolence, 1584 N. Van Ness Blvd. The Fresno Center for Nonviolence will be showing the film “30 Seconds to Midnight.” This is co-sponsored by Peace Fresno, Social Action Committee of the Unitarian Universalist Church and WILPF. The filmmaker, Regis Tremblay, will be present to talk about the film and answer questions. Open and free to the public, wheelchair accessible. Run-time is 1:34. For more information email or call Angela Price at angela.price41@comcast.net 559-304-9183.

A shocking documentary that traces the origins of U.S. genocides, military interventions and wars from the 15th century when the white, colonial explorers first came to the Americas to the very present. American Exceptionalism, Manifest Destiny, and the right to claim the earth and its resources as their own are the beliefs that are the foundation of American foreign policy in the 21st Century that has humanity on the brink of extinction. Dr. Helen Caldicot, Ray McGovern, Chris Hedges, Ann Wright, Peter Kuznick, Bill McKibben, David Vine, Bruce Gagnon, and other activists, scholars, and authors explain and clarify the crisis and threats to life on the planet.

Saturday, April 22nd at Radio Park (First and Clinton) Fresno Earth Day from 10 to 4. Our Center for Nonviolence will have a table there and our theme this year is “fashion”. We will be modeling previously owned clothes on the main stage throughout the day – clothing from local charity and vintage shops. For more information contact Angela angela.price41@comcast.net.

Monday, April 24th at 6:30 p.m. and
Thursday, 27th at 2 p.m. at the Fresno Center for Nonviolence, 1584 N. Van Ness (SE corner Van Ness and McKinley) the film Slowing Down Fast Fashion. Alex James presents this critical look at the fashion industry and its enormous human and environmental cost. Far from predicting the apocalypse, it seeks to provide solutions. By talking to designers, activists and high street brands the film shows that there is a wide-ranging and ever growing thirst for change as consumers start to look at clothes the way they look at food. Run-time 64 minutes. For more information contact the Center at 559-237-3223 Mon-Fri 11-3. Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.

Tuesday, April 25th at 6:30 p.m. at Wesley United Methodist Church, 1343 E. Barstow Ave. Pastors for Peace Caravan to Cuba potluck. Cuba is an evolving society and things are changing rather rapidly. But you are in luck – Pastors for Peace is on top of it and will be here in Fresno to share up-to-date information on what is happening there. Our featured speaker will be Manolo De Los Santos, who works with Pastors for Peace to coordinate solidarity work in Cuba, Haiti and Central America. For more information contact Leni Reeves at lenivreeves@gmail.com

Saturday, May 6 at 6 p.m. at 1st Congregational Church (Big Red Church), 2131 N. Van Ness Blvd., Fresno, CA The Fresno Center for Nonviolence will celebrate its 25th Anniversary with a Banquet and Speaker, Kathy Kelly. It will be catered by Tree of Life Café and Bakery. Tickets are available at the Center, from any Board member or by emailing or calling Ron Vineyard at ronvineyard@sbcglobal.net; 559-289-6277. There will also be Speaker Only tickets. For more information call the Center at 559-237-3223 Mon-Fri 11-3.

Kathy Kelly is an activist working with Voices for Creative Nonviolence. Kelly will speak about “Confronting State Violence at Home and Abroad. She will talk about people forced by wars to flee their homes in Afghanistan and about people trapped in the U.S. prison industrial complex, inclusive of Guantanamo, immigration detention centers and the vast network of U.S. prisons and jails – people separated mercilessly from their families and homes. Kelly is among Voices activists who have recently traveled to Russia, wanting to learn more about how ordinary Russians regard U.S./NATO provocations on their border.

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19 Mar
0

Just Added: CDP: 2017 Convention Delegate Training in Tulare County – Sunday, April 23

 

For more information and to RSVP click here: https://cademdelegatetraining-centralvalleytulare.eventbrite.com

We know that convention can seem a little daunting, so we want to make it easier, less intimidating, and help you make wise use of your time and money. In partnership with local Democrats, the Party is offering Delegate Trainings around the state.

The agenda includes a brief state party history, Democratic Party structure (from the Federal Party all the way to Clubs), avenues of Party engagement, and the nuts and bolts of Convention itself. We’ll cover where people sit, credentials and credentialing, the weekend agenda (including voting), general sessions, extra activities, and how to prepare in advance for a fun, effective weekend. We’ll conclude with an open Question & Answer period.

Delegate Trainings require an RSVP! Seating is limited.

For more information and to RSVP click here: https://cademdelegatetraining-centralvalleytulare.eventbrite.com

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19 Mar
0

Wednesday, March 22 1-4 PM

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